Six people stand in a row, posing for a photograph.
Pictured left to right: Sandy Larson, Erik Jopp, Jessica Evanson, Nicole Neeser, Bob Leuer, Lisa Wetzel

 

The Drug Residue Prevention Program outreach team members each bring a unique set of skills, experiences, and areas of expertise to their work. Click on their names below to learn a little more about each of them!

What is your educational training and background?

I graduated from Ross University Veterinary School and went on to complete my Master of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. I worked as a public health veterinarian with the USDA before joining the MDA.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

I figured out early on in veterinary school that I wanted to focus on public health. After that, opportunities in food safety began to present themselves. Most notably, I got to spend time in rural Uganda testing animals for brucellosis (a foodborne disease) and educating community members on how to protect themselves.

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

I value getting to know the hardworking folks in our agricultural community and working alongside them to teach AND learn how we can bring consumers the safest products possible.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

Your veterinarian is your best resource. Make sure you have established a veterinary-client-patient relationship. If you don't know what this is, check out our resource page!

What is your educational training and background?

I am a graduate of the University of Minnesota Veterinary School. Previously, I worked as a private practice veterinarian for over twenty years before joining the MDA.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

I was looking for a professional challenge. Food safety provided an opportunity to combine my interest in drug residues and my veterinary knowledge gained from my years in private practice.

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

I truly enjoy visiting with the producers while providing useful information they can immediately put into practice. I also appreciate the Drug Residue Prevention Program team of practical, knowledgeable people who are willing to put in the extra effort in partnership with producers to make a change in food safety.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

Read and follow the FDA-approved drug label, and periodically discuss animal health treatment protocols (including withdrawal times!) with your veterinarian.

What is your educational training and background?

I am a graduate of the University of Minnesota Veterinary School. I worked in private practice for about ten years, mainly in Dairy production, before joining the MDA.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

Growing up on a farm and involved in agriculture, veterinary medicine and food safety were a perfect fit with my interests.

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

I appreciate having great colleagues at the MDA and like getting out on farms to meet with the producers who deal with animal and food safety every day.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

Work with your veterinarian and ask questions. Antibiotic stewardship is everyone’s responsibility, and it continues to evolve.

What is your educational training and background?

I have a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Animal Science from the University of Minnesota, and I am an alumnus of the International Food Protection Training Institute (IFPTI) Fellowship Program.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

I have been involved in agriculture my entire life. I have seen the importance of food safety and quality to consumers and wanted to do my part to ensure a wholesome food supply while still working closely food producers.

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

I enjoy learning new things from my great coworkers. This is truly a collaborative group, and we make each other better at our jobs every time we meet.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

You can’t get where you want to go if you don’t know where you’ve been. Recordkeeping, especially regarding antibiotic use, can add value both to the quality of food you produce and your farm’s bottom line.

What is your educational training and background?

I have a Master of Education in Youth Development Leadership and a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, both from the University of Minnesota.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

I have always had a strong personal and professional interest in agriculture. Working with training and outreach for the Dairy and Meat Inspection Division seemed to be a great melding of my interests and education.

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

It is wonderful to work with and get to know all of the hardworking people in our agricultural community. These people really have a passion for what they do, and they take the responsibility of raising a safe and abundant food supply very seriously.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

Take advantage of the services our program’s Outreach Veterinarians can provide. They have years of practical experience and are very down to earth and easy to work with.

What is your educational training and background?

I received my Veterinary Degree and a Master of Public Health in Food Safety and Biosecurity from the University of Minnesota.

How did you end up in a food safety career?

I grew up around agriculture, on a farm, and it just happened (this is too long of a story to tell)!

What is your favorite part about working for the Drug Residue Prevention Program?

I have an excellent team of people to work with who are sincerely interested in teaming up with livestock producers to achieve better outcomes in food safety.

What is the best piece of advice you have for livestock producers working with antibiotics?

Stewardship of antibiotics is a big part of demonstrating your commitment to both animal and human health.