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Home > Renewable Energy > Ethanol Program > Ethanol Plants & Capacities

Ethanol Plants & Capacities (Updated September 2009)


Ethanol Plants & Capacities

City (plant name) Ethanol Capacity
Million Gallons/year
Corn Million
Bushels Used/year
Start-up
year
New Generation
Co-op Members **
Marshall (ADM) 40 14.8* 1988 (Public Corp)
Morris (DENCO) 25 9.0 1991 Corporation
Winnebago (Corn Plus) 49 17.4 1994 750
Winthrop (Heartland) 100 37 1995 692
Benson (CVEC) 46 17 1996 850
Claremont (Al-Corn) 38 12.6 1996 354
Bingham Lake (Ethanol2000) 35 13 1997 241
Buffalo Lake (MN Energy) 19 7.0 1997 325
Preston (Pro-Corn) 42 16 1998 159
Luverne (Agri-Energy LLC) 22 8 1998 197
Little Falls (CMEC) 22 8.1 1999 820
Albert Lea (Exol/Agri Resources) 41 15.2 1999 496
Lake Crystal 56 20 2005 LLC
(Granite Falls Energy) 48 18 2005 LLC
Atwater (Bushmills Ethanol) 49 18 2005 LLC
(Heron Lake Bioenergy) 50 18 2007 LLC
Otter Tail (Fergus Falls) 55 20 2008 LLC
Fairmont (Buffalo Lake Energy) 110 40 2008 LLC
Welcome (Valero) 110 40 2009 Corp
Lamberton (Highwater) 50 18 2009 LLC
Guardian Energy, Janesville 110 40 2009 LLC
TOTAL 1,117 406 mm bus.   4,880+ members

 

Processing corn products instead of exporting raw corn doubles the value of each bushel. In addition to fuel ethanol, corn plants can produce over 3,300,000 tons of high protein livestock feed plus other products including: industrial and beverage ethanol, industrial starch, corn oil, sweeteners and carbon dioxide.

* The Marshall Plant corn milling capacity is estimated to include an additional 25,000,000 bushels of corn to make starch and sweeteners totaling 40,000,000 bushels for the plant. Therefore, the total estimated industrial corn milling capacity for Minnesota is about 430 million bushels per year."

** Plants organized as New Generation Farmer Co-ops (NGC) may be combined with, converted to or organized as limited liability companies or business structures that are generally designed to:

  • be built by farmers and local businessmen to process member crops,
  • return more cash to farmers than conventional markets would provide,
  • be controlled by farmer/local board members so that member profits remain a top priority,
  • create a stable source of local jobs and economic development.

The business structure of some plants listed above may have changed in a way that makes it difficult to determine the manner in which the farmer control or other NGC features described above may currently apply to a given plant. In addition, some plants described as LLC’s also employ certain NGC characteristics and have hundreds of farmer members.

MDA Contact

Kevin Hennessy, Biofuels Specialist
Kevin.Hennessy@state.mn.us, 651-201-6223

Ag Marketing & Development Division