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Home > Plants, Pests & Pest Control > Insects & Pests > Chinese Longhorned Beetle

Chinese Longhorned Beetle | Invasive Pest Alert


Adult Chinese longhorned beetle - ventral view. Photo credit: Christopher Pierce, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org 
Adult Chinese longhorned beetle (dorsal view). Photo credit: Christopher Pierce, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

Adult Chinese longhorned beetle - dorsal view. Photo credit: Christopher Pierce, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org 
Adult Chinese longhorned beetle (ventral view). Photo credit: Christopher Pierce, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

Wood damaged by a European species of Hesperophanes. Photo credit: Gyorgy Csoka, Hungary Forest Research Institute, Bugwood.org 
Wood damaged by a European species of Hesperophanes. Photo credit: Gyorgy Csoka, Hungary Forest Research Institute, Bugwood.org

 

 

Scientific name: Hesperophanes campestris
(Synonym: Trichoferus campestris)

This pest is not to be confused with the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis), which is a different tree pest of concern.

History:

  • Originally from Asia and parts of Eastern Europe.
  • Spreads to new areas through movement of infested wood and by flying.
  • On June 23, 2010, a single adult beetle was caught in a USDA-operated trap in an industrial area in Minneapolis near the border of St. Paul. The identity of the pest was confirmed on November 10, 2010 by USDA.
  • Also detected in traps in Illinois (2009, 2010) and Quebec, Canada (2002, 2006).

Lifecycle & Description:

  • Life cycle: Larvae overwinter in wood and pupate in spring. Adults emerge from wood and are active from June to August. Adults mate and females lay eggs on bark. Larvae hatch from eggs and tunnel under bark and eventually into the wood. May require 1 to 2 years to complete life cycle.
  • Adults: Elongate, 11 to 20 mm body with long antennae and parallel sided elytra (i.e., hardened wing covers). Dark brown to brownish-orange in color with legs and antennae often being lighter in color than rest of body. Elytra covered with short hairs.
  • Larvae: Up to 25 mm long, yellowish-white in color with brownish head and short, poorly developed legs.
  • Identification of this species is difficult due to a multitude of related species that may be found in the same types of trees.

Impacts:

  • Larval feeding under bark and in wood can stress or kill trees, and reduces marketability of wood. Feeding damage can reduce yield of fruit trees.
  • Infests healthy, stressed or dying trees and cut wood.
  • Preferred hosts include apple and mulberry, but have been documented feeding on long list of species (e.g., maple, birch, beech, ash, locust, walnut, larch, fir, cedar, oak, willow, mountain ash, elm, grape, sumac) and cut wood of spruce and pine.

Response in Minnesota:

  • State and federal agricultural authorities are working to determine if the beetle captured in Minneapolis was associated with infested wood packing material or an infestation of trees in the area.
  • Pest potential in North America remains undetermined. A federal science advisory group is reviewing data to determine if regulation is necessary.
  • Citizens should be on the lookout for declining trees with obvious wood borer activity (holes in tree, sawdust near base of tree).

If you suspect you have seen this pest or an infestation in Minnesota, Contact the Minnesota Department of Agriculture

"Arrest the Pest" Hotline 
Arrest.the.Pest@state.mn.us
1-888-545-6684 (Voicemail)